ATG Conferences, Meetings & Webinars 7/1/19

by | Jul 1, 2019 | 0 comments

Dates: Monday, 7/29/2019 – Friday, 9/6/2019

Description: This six-week online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including:

  • The definition of collection assessment
  • Techniques and tools
  • Assessment of print and electronic collections
  • Project design and management

The course is offered several times each year.  You only need to take one session.  Sessions tend to sell out weeks in advance.

Format:  Students receive login instructions one week prior to the course start date.  Students have 24/7 access to the course site for the six-week period, and aside from assignment and quiz deadlines, the course may be completed at their own pace.  Instructors provide guidance and feedback as students work their way through the course material.  Weekly, instructor-moderated chat sessions are the only live course events that students are asked to attend.

Weekly Chat Schedule:  The following times are tentative and may change according to instructor availability.

Week One: Thursday at 2:00 pm CDT
Week Two: Tuesday at 12:00 noon CDT
Week Three: Wednesday at 3:00 pm CDT
Week Four: Monday at 11:00 am CDT
Week Five: Wednesday at 3:00 pm CDT
Week Six: Thursday at 1:00 pm CDT…

 

Cost $139 ALCTS members; $169 nonmembersNOTE:
Any requests for cancelation or changes to registration must be received in writing by ALCTS or the ALA registration department (MACS) no later than 7 days prior to the start of the course and are subject to a $40 processing fee.

How to Register

Register online using the online learning registration site.  Courses are listed by session date.  Click on the “register link” located to the right of the session you are interested in.   You will be prompted to login with your ALA member ID or create a guest account, to begin the registration process.

Register by mail (purchase order or check) by completing this print registration form. Tip: If you’re unable to open this “register by mail” link, right-click the link and save the form to your computer.

Questions?

For registration related questions, call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 and speak to our customer service representatives.


The ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Jennifer Beamer, Sandra Enimil, and John Martin as the newest presenters for the one-day RoadShow Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement. Jennifer, Sandra, and John join the current presenter team as partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the workshop.

Jennifer Beamer is the Scholarly Communications Librarian/Coordinator at the Claremont Colleges Consortium, Sandra Enimil is the Copyright Services Librarian and Program Director of Copyright Services at The Ohio State University, and John Martin is the Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of North Texas…

The Scholarly Communication RoadShow is part of ACRL’s slate of day-long workshops that can be brought year-round to your campus, chapter, or consortium worldwide. Contact ACRL Program Officer Chase Ollis at collis@ala.org with questions or to discuss dates and locations, pricing, and for complete workshop details.


KnowledgeSpeak reports that “foundational planning is currently underway for the formation of an Open Access Book Network. Development of this network was the topic of a recent ELPUB 2019 Conference panel session led by Eelco Ferwerda from OAPEN, with the University of Cambridge’s Rupert Gatti, Pierre Mounier of OPERAS, Andrea Bertino of SUB Goettingen, and SPARC Europe Director Vanessa Proudman.

The original idea for the network was born in Autumn 2018 during an OA books event hosted by Knowledge Exchange in Brussels as a follow-up of the landscape study published earlier. Proudman initiated the concept to establish a sustainable knowledge network in Europe to accelerate the innovation of the OA book publishing industry, a network that is inclusive of all of Europe and that shares lessons learnt from all parts of the continent.

This initial ideation was followed by a December 2018 meeting in Amsterdam where the needs and goals of such a network were addressed. The purpose of this month’s ELPUB session was to float the concept with the broader OA book community – and to gauge their reaction.

The ELPUB Conference panel and audience dove into issues including potential challenges, who, specifically, the network would serve; approaches for launching such a network and funding.

Among the challenges discussed was the fact that numerous Open Science networks, including the Open Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), Association of University Presses (AUP), OPERAS, Research Data Alliance (RDA), or OpenAIRE, already exist; and the importance of not duplicating efforts was emphasised. The point was also raised that organisers could learn from these on how to manage this new OA Book Network…”


The planning committee for the 2020 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to join continue these conversations July 24, 2020 in Washington, DC at George Washington University.

This gathering seeks to create an inclusive space for difficult, fruitful conversations around technology, however defined, as it affects and is affected by race, gender, sexuality, and ability. We aim to foster conversations that consider “technology” as the expression of material cultures, labor, and embodiment; as well as sites of empowerment or oppression.

In libraries, and in the professional discourses of librarianship and information studies, we often talk about “technology” as a means to an end. Or, we speculate about technology as though it emanated from the horizon of a futurity that appears sometimes threatening, sometimes empowering, but always inevitable: e.g., artificial intelligence will “revolutionize” the ways we find and use information. Both kinds of discourse omit the ways technologies begin and end in the flesh — how technologies shape habits of body and mind, just as those habits influence the design and construction of technologies.

We invite proposals that address the problems, power, and potential of “technologies” in libraries and archives, past, present, and future, and seek a range of interpretations of the concept of technology.

Questions might include, but are not limited to:

  • How do search algorithms, metadata standards, and user interfaces challenge or reinforce white supremacy, heteronormative patriarchy, and ableism?
  • How do our catalogs, databases, finding aids, and collections disguise the traces of oppression, even while perpetuating the violence visited upon the oppressed?
  • How do we talk about the absence of voices (either in the historical record or from our present-day communities) that haunts the architecture and design of our systems?
  • How have technologies been used to selectively forget pasts to perpetuate certain futures? How are technologies used to unearth the forgotten?
  • How do we address the absent presence of laboring bodies behind our technologies, especially those bodies whose labor is devalued and poorly remunerated?
  • How do we begin to redress the inequities that library and information technologies perpetuate, where the default user is most often white and able-bodied, and whose architects, designers, and managers are most often white cis men?
  • What kinds of digital cultural memory and community-based projects are critical right now?

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here: http://bit.ly/GSISC2020

Deadline for submission: November 15, 2019

Notification by January 15, 2020

Registration opens February 1, 2020. Please direct any questions or concerns to GSISC2020@gmail.com

Organizing committee:

Jennifer Brown, Barnard College
Emily Drabinski, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Leah Richardson, The George Washington University
Hannah Scates Kettler, University of Iowa
Kristan Shawgo, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Dolsy Smith, The George Washington University
Tonia Sutherland, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Hannah Wang, Wisconsin Historical Society

 

For an archive of past messages from the ILI listserv, visit: http://lists.ala.org/sympa/info/ili-l.

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