UK’s scientific legacy in the Royal Society’s new digital archive;  *UK Research Libraries, Others Plan to Research Use of Citation Capture for Unique and Distinctive Collections in Academic Publications;  *A New Digital Collection From the Library of Congress Provides Online Access to 64 Motion Pictures Named to the National Film Registry;  *State of Tennessee Breaks Ground on $123 Million State Library and Archives Facility;  and *ProQuest Shares Concerns About Non-English-Language Content in Academic Libraries plus more library and publishing news from a variety of sources.


KnowledgeSpeak also notes thatThe Royal Society, the UK’s national academy of sciences, is making over 330 years’ worth of high-quality, full colour images from its journals available online. The content, which includes annotations, illustrations, and additional material between 1665 and 1996, has so far only been available to people visiting the library. Up until January 24, 2018, the archive will be free to access…”


infoDOCKET reports that “Research Libraries UK, The National Archives and Jisc are delighted to be working together to commission a significant piece of research into the use and presentation of unique and distinctive collections in academic publications as recorded through citations…”


Also according to infoDOCKET “Sixty-four motion pictures, named to the Library’s National Film Registry, are now available online. Access to the collection of films is available in two locations. Direct to”Selections from the National Film Registry” via LC Digital Collections and/or via YouTube.

These films are among hundreds of titles that have been tapped for preservation because of their cultural, historical and aesthetic significance…”


infoDOCKET also notes that “after more than a decade of planning, the state of Tennessee has started construction on a new Library & Archives building, as officials formally broke ground Monday at the corner of Sixth Avenue North and Jefferson Street.

The 165,000-square-foot facility will house government records, photographs, books and other documents. The building has been budgeted at $123.8 million and will feature a climate-controlled chamber and robotic retrieval system…”


Information Today reports that “ProQuest released survey results showing that “[a]cademic libraries are struggling to meet a rising demand for non-English language content”—more than one-third of the 170-plus North American librarians surveyed are “falling short in making these resources available to students, faculty and researchers.” According to the press release, key findings include the following:

  • Budget and expertise are common hurdles North American libraries face in meeting users’ needs for non-English language content. Libraries struggle to justify the expense of content that will be used by a small number of users and unless they have the relevant language skills, they find it challenging to select materials that address researchers’ needs…”

More library and publishing news from a variety of sources