ATG Quirkies: Reading Lost Languages

This post by journalist Brigit Katz writing in the Smithsonian reports on the lost languages discovered in one of the world’s oldest continuously run libraries… Ms. Katz cites a report from the...

ATG Quirkies: Are Emojis the New Body Language?

This post in Nautilus by Vyvyan Evans acknowledges the incredible growth in the use of emojis in digital communications. In fact, he notes that they have become so prevalent that some cultural critic...

ATG Quirkies: Terry Pratchett: His Own Worst Critic.

Terry Pratchett, “a wildly popular fantasy novelist who wrote more than 70 books”, had a final request prior to his death in 2015. Mr. Pratchett wanted “whatever he was working on at the ...

ATG Quirkies: Jackie Kennedy, the Editor

This fascinating post in Town & Country tells how Jackie Kennedy started on the road to becoming a powerful book editor more than 10 years after leaving the White House. Author Nancy Bilyeau reco...

ATG Quirkies: Shakepeare’s Own Dictionary on eBay?

According to this post on The Atlantic the answer may be yes. Two New York City booksellers claim that they have Shakespeare’s Personal Dictionary on eBay. Many scholars think that Shakespeare ...

ATG Quirkies: You Say ISBN. I Say IZBIN.

In this post Adrian Tahourdin, French Editor at the TLS does a service for those of us us who never quite understood a key identifier used by the publishing world. He decodes the ISBN. Mr Tahourdin e...

ATG Quirkies: The Internet of Living Things

Microbes have their own version of the internet and it is wonderfully explained in this post on PHYS.ORG. “Creating a huge global network connecting billions of individuals might be one of huma...

ATG Quirkies: The Trick to Remembering Passwords

Want to know the secret to remembering passwords? Well according Teller, of Penn & Teller fame, just ask a magician. And in this Wall Street Journal post, Teller offers his personal technique. He...

ATG Quirkies: Forward Into the Past

  If you think sci-fi is about the future, think again, at least, according to this post in Economist 1843 by Nicholas Barber, a film critic for The Economist, BBC Culture online and the Guardia...