ATG Podcast: Preconference Preview Part 3 – Combating “Fake News”

Preconference Preview Part 3 – Combating “Fake News” – Listen Now!

This week, we have another in our series of Charleston Conference preconference previews! We have an amazing group of preconference sessions that will be held on Monday and Tuesday, November 6 and 7, prior to the start of the main conference. This is the third installment in our series of preconference previews, and we’ll continue that in the future with more episodes that interview the presenters and give a little bit more background and detail on the sessions themselves. You can find registration for these sessions on the main conference registration page, and session details are available on the conference website.

As a reminder, there are several applications that are open for opportunities at the conference we’d like to draw your attention to. First, the Charleston Fast Pitch Competition is looking for proposals that pitch a winning idea to improve service at an academic or research library. This contest is designed to recognize and reward new innovation in academic library and information management.

The Juried Product Development Forums, or JPDF’s, are designed to offer publishers and vendors a chance to discuss new products in development, or improvements to existing products, and receive feedback from librarians and library workers.

The Charleston Premiers are lightning round sessions designed to showcase new products and innovations already in the marketplace but that may not be widely known yet. Details on all of these events are available on the conference website at the links provided in the show notes.

Registration for the conference is open now. Be sure to register by September 15 to receive the early bird rate – our regular and late rates have increased this year but the early bird rate stayed the same as the past few years.

On today’s podcast, we’re talking with Judy LutherHeather StainesLisa Janicke Hinchliffe, and Pierre Montagano who are all participants in the preconference titled “Practical Measures: Combating “Fake News” through Scholarly Integrity, Digital Literacy, and Workflow Tools.” This session will be held on Tuesday, November 7, from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm.

The session will be moderated by Judy Luther, President of Informed Strategies. Professionally she’s passionate about good design of content that meets the needs of the users. Personally Judy loves being outdoors in nature and enjoys quiet moments with a good cup of tea.

Pierre Montagano is the Business Development Director for Code Ocean, a Cornell Tech incubated startup. He has over 20 years’ experience in publishing but recently left to work with researchers in developing an executable code repository that helps facilities reproducibility and reuse of scientific code.

Heather Staines is Director of Partnerships for Hypothesis, a non-profit open source annotation/collaboration technology, working with publishers, educators, journalists, and researchers to bring annotation to conversations anywhere on the web. She has a background in scholarly publishing and educational technology.

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe is a Professor and Coordinator for Information Literacy and affiliate faculty in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois. A passionate educator, she speaks and writes frequently about library services and impact on library users.

Since Judy is moderating the session, she also moderates the podcast interview.

Before we get to the interview, Katina Strauch has some updates to her “If Rumors Were Horses” column from ATG:

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has selected the awesome Elaine L. Westbrooks, associate university librarian for research at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, as its new University librarian and vice provost for University Libraries. Approved by the University’s Board of Trustees, the appointment is effective Aug. 15. “Chancellor Carol Folt and I are excited to welcome Elaine to Carolina,” said Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost James W. Dean Jr. “She brings more than 19 years of higher education library experience to her role, where she will oversee one of the top-ranked university library systems in the country, including its services and more than 9 million volumes across 10 libraries.” At the University of Michigan, Westbrooks led the library’s support of the research enterprise, facilitated the management of the operations and budget.

Prior to her time in Ann Arbor, Westbrooks worked at research libraries at three other universities. She served as associate dean of libraries at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, held several positions in technical services at Cornell University Libraries and worked as a digital research and Latin American Cataloger at the University of Pittsburgh. The co-author of three books, along with several book chapters, Westbrooks lectures at numerous conferences. She also serves on the Association for Research Libraries Visioning Taskforce, was recently the chair of the HathiTrust Rights and Access Committee and also served on the HathiTrust Program Steering Committee. Westbrooks earned a bachelor of arts degree in linguistics and a master’s degree in information and library science from the University of Pittsburgh. She succeeds Sarah Michalak, who retired in December 2016. Carol Hunter, deputy University librarian and associate University librarian for collections and services, has served as interim University librarian since Michalak’s departure. She will retire from Carolina on Oct. 1.

It’s been too long since we saw Bill Kane in Charleston! Bill is at Wake Forest University in the Digital Publishing Department. What a dynamo! Anyway, just got an email from Bill who has also worked at Blackwell’s and Alibris, remember? Bill was writing Beth Bernhardt, Rosann Bazirjian and yours truly to tell us that the long-retired Jack Walsdorf left us on July 9, 2017.

You might remember that Jack sponsored the Rachel K. Schenck Memorial Scholarship  for the Charleston  Conference for five years (2003-2007). Jack was so generous and he knew everyone back in the day. Jack used to select a book a year to distribute at Christmas from Blackwell’s.  He also ran several evening talks on rare books way back when the Charleston Conference was in its infancy. Back then we were holding the Conference in the College of Charleston Lightsey Conference Center which has since closed and become classrooms.

A Memorial Service to honor Jack is being planned to take place in the month of September. In lieu of flowers, please consider a charitable donation in Jack’s memory to one of the following organizations that he himself supported: 

The Lake Oswego Preservation Society: http://lakeoswegopreservationsociety.org

The William Morris Society in the United States: http://www.morrissociety.org

or a library of one’s choice.

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4501&context=atg

http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=Jack-Walsdorf&lc=7398&pid=186070273&mid=7481936

Bill also sends a link to a wonderful interview with Jack from a few years ago.
http://themorrisian.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-morrisian-interview-series-2-john-j.html

The incredibly resilient Chuck Hamaker sent me a link to a recent article in the Guardian – Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science?. It’s long but is a summary of much of what we in libraries have lived through over the past several decades – the growth of powerful publishing companies, rising journal costs, shrinking budget, the big deal. There are many familiar people and companies we know. Richard Charkin, Albert Henderson, Pergamon, Springer, Elsevier, John Coales, Denis Noble, Bob Houbeck, and last but not least Robert Maxwell. I remember visiting Pergamon in England hoping to get an interview, if not a glimpse of the famous man. Della Sar, Brian Cox, Inge Valentine, Bob Miranda have many reminiscences (favorable and unfavorable). I also remember — it was during the Charleston Conference in November 5, 1991 that we learned that Maxweil had died when he fell off his yacht in the Canary Islands, leading to much speculation and autopsies.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/profitable-business-scientific-publishing-bad-for-science

http://www.charlestonlibraryconference.com/archives-old.php

So long for now!

Katina.

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