ATG People in the News 7/26/17

Members of the ARL Diversity and Inclusion Committee and their designees have chosen 18 master of library and information science (MLIS) students to participate in the 2017–2019 Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) as ARL diversity scholars.

Funded by ARL member libraries, the IRDW offers financial support to program participants as well as leadership development through the ARL Annual Leadership Symposium, a formal mentoring program, career placement assistance, and a site visit to an ARL library. This program reflects the commitment of ARL members to address the historical underrepresentation of many racial and ethnic groups within the research library and archives workforce. The IRDW helps create a diverse professional community that will better meet the needs of researchers, students, and other constituencies whose demographics and perspectives are quickly evolving…

The 2017–2019 ARL diversity scholars are:

  • LaReina Nicole Adams, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Aicha Azzaoui, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Leyla Cabugos, San Jose State University
  • Alexa Carter, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jeannie Yujing Chen, UCLA
  • Zakiya Collier, Long Island University/New York University
  • Sarah Frances Corona, UCLA
  • Sonja C. Cossio, Clarion University
  • Veronica Franco, The University of Arizona
  • Kaneisha Gaston, North Carolina Central University
  • Codi Domonique Jones, The University of Oklahoma
  • Aldrich A. Linton, San Jose State University
  • Carli Lowe, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Teresa Helena Moreno, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Karen Ng, The University of British Columbia
  • Diana E. Park, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
  • Andrea Salazar, Wayne State University
  • Mark F. Sandoval, The University of Arizona

For more information about the IRDW, visit the ARL Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce website.


William & Mary librarian Kathleen DeLaurenti has been featured in the book This is What a Librarian Looks Like by Kyle Cassidy, a celebratory tribute to the unsung community heroes. As a music and arts librarian at the W&M Music Library and Open Access Editor for the Music Library Association, DeLaurenti helps people access resources and make their work available to a broader audience.

“Being a librarian means helping put people in touch with the tools and resources they need to explore their creativity and make new knowledge,” said DeLaurenti. “I love helping people think about what kind of impact they want their work to have and then helping them decide about how it will be sold or given away and under what conditions other people can share or reuse it.”

DeLaurenti is just one of almost 220 librarians featured in Cassidy’s book. From brightly-dyed hair and tattoos to collared shirts and bow ties, this photographic montage of librarians from communities across the country gives a new perspective on who librarians are and what they look like – and it’s not the stern, humorless stereotype commonly portrayed in books and films. Librarians around the nation are fighting for patrons who need library resources to live in the modern age of technology. As a part of Cassidy’s project, DeLaurenti has called attention to the challenges music libraries face with collecting and preserving digital music.

With the rise of digital music, it has become increasingly harder for music libraries to collect and share music, particularly music released through services like iTunes and Tidal, due to ownership rights. DeLaurenti explained that libraries aren’t able to purchase MP3s because they can’t be shared like a CD, which prevents libraries from preserving music for scholars and listeners of the future…

In addition to highlighting the challenges faced by music libraries, DeLaurenti hopes that readers of Cassidy’s book learn about all of the different ways that librarians support, advocate and impact their communities every day…”


ALA’s Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment reports the following:

 

 

 

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