ATG News You Need to Start the Week 6/26/17

US court grants Elsevier millions in damages from Sci-Hub;   *The Association of American Publishers welcomes judgment against ‘Sci-Hub’ pirate site;   *Collaboration essential for the future of the academic book, reveals Academic Book of the Future report;   *Print Books vs. Ebooks: Who’s Up, Who’s Down, and Where Are We Headed?;  and *European Commission Puts Research Infrastructures Back on the Map; Millennials May Be the Salvation of Libraries plus more library and publishing news from a variety of sources.


Nature reports that “Elsevier, won a default legal judgement on 21 June against websites that provide illicit access to tens of millions of research papers and books. A New York district court awarded Elsevier US$15 million in damages for copyright infringement by Sci-Hub, the Library of Genesis (LibGen) project and related sites…”


KnowledgeSpeak reports that “the Association of American Publishers (AAP) welcomes the June 21, 2017 ruling of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York regarding the wilful infringement of scores of scholarly articles protected by copyright law. Ruling in favour of Elsevier, the publisher that brought the action, the Court entered a default judgment against Sci-Hub, the Library Genesis Project, and a number of related sites, and against the defendant operator.


Also according to KnowledgeSpeak “two major new reports demonstrate that the future of the academic book is at a crossroads with the number of new book proposals growing rapidly but sales per title continuing to fall. Researchers on the Academic Book of the Future project are recommending that academics and publishers work together to develop a new vision for the sector that embraces technology and focuses on enhancing the readers experience…

The full reports can be viewed at: https://academicbookfuture.org/end-of-project-reports-2/


According to Information Today “A roundup of recent news and data shows that print is still going strong and provides a few hints about how marketplace developments and librarians’ collection development plans are evolving.
For more on ebooks, read the Ebooks Revisited articles in the June issue of Computers in Libraries magazine. “Ebook ROI: A Longitudinal Study of Patron-Driven Acquisition Models” is available here for free.


Information Today also reports that “The European Commission (EC) is funding a project that will continue the development of the MERIL (Mapping of the European Research Infrastructure Landscape) portal and database. The initial phase of MERIL began in 2010, when its goal was to build an up-to-date database of European research infrastructures in the sciences.

MERIL-2, the current 3-year phase, has an expanded team that “will provide the means for making informed assessments and decisions about the research infrastructure landscape in Europe, and to encourage accessibility, new partnerships and collaborations within the scientific community,” according to CORDIS, the EC’s Community Research and Development Information Service.


According to Good E-reader “while previous studies have shown the majority of Americans cite libraries as a vital public resource in their communities, those same studies cited an alarming fact: Americans simply don’t use their libraries. Fortunately, their luck is about to change. New survey results from the Pew Research Center have found that millenials are stepping up in a big way and taking advantage of what public libraries have to offer.

 

More library and publishing news from a variety of sources

 

 

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