Innovation Lightning Round 1: Collection Development: Analysis and Assessment, Digital Scholarship, and Scholarly Communication Threads

Innovation Lightning Round 1 Speakers

Innovation Lightning Round 1 Speakers

The Plenary and Neapolitan sessions were followed by 3 concurrent “Lightning Round” sessions–a new feature of the conference this year:

  1. Collection Development: Analysis and Assessment, Digital Scholarship, and Scholarly Communication
  2. End User/Use Statistics and Management/Leadership
  3. Out of the Box Thinking/Entrepreneurship and Technology/Trends

Each session consisted of 4 or 5 brief presentations. I attended Round 1.

Virginia Martin, Electronic Resources Acquisitions Coordinator, Duke University Libraries and her colleagues, spoke about CPCR (Cost Per Cited Reference), a term they coined in response to a need to go beyond CPU and raw usage data.

CPCR

CPCR provides a quantitative measure of the usefulness of licensed contents to an institution’s researchers as well as an additional metric to assist in making cancellation decisions. It does not measure the value of the actual research in the journal. CPCR was applied to the Duke Libraries Springer Big Deal:

CPCR and the Big Deal

Here is an example of a cancelled title that could have been saved using CPCR data.

Saving a cancellation

The next steps: Improve the approach to data collection, cleanup, and storage; evaluate more years of Springer data; and evaluate additional packages with more traditional big deal models, such those of Wiley.

 

Harriett Green from the University of Illinois and her colleagues spoke about scholarly requirements for large-scale text analysis: an analysis of Hathi Trust Research Center (HTRC) data. Here is how the worksets were created and the findings of the study.

Research Study

 

Research Goals

 

Data Sources

Here are the findings for the three audiences for which user personas were developed.

Research results for user personas

The study is in its second phase and will be expanded with interviews with social scientists.

 

Robert Green from Indiana University is also participating with the Hathi Trust Research Center (HTRC); he discussed the research center as a distant publisher. Here is his definition of distant publishing.

Distant Publishing

 

Lisla Macklin from Emory University described a model publishing contract to look at the future of the monograph.  Long-form digital works have a value, but current book contracts do not address changes in business or distribution models. So the Mellon Foundation funded the development of a contract that accommodates open access publication and encapsulates the evolution of scholarship. The contract is in its third version and will be released imminently with a CC0 license, which balances the needs of the presses, author, and publisher. The author has the option of publishing in open access using a CC license. The responsibilities of the author and publisher are defined in the contract. Giving credit to multiple authors, hosting, third party content and permissions, and preservation are also addressed. Input from authors, university presses, and publishers is being solicited.

 

Peter Rolla from the UC San Diego Library discussed Born-Digital Objects: Acquisition and Management of PDFs. Acquisition of one-off PDF documents on specialized subjects is a frequent and annoying issue that often arises. They are useful because they support the library’s collections in areas of strength on the campus. The problem is how to store and manage them; options are:

  • Using the library’s commercial DASH tool,
  • Hosting on a library server or computer,
  • Printing them out and placing the printed copies in the stacks, or
  • Adding them to the library’s digital collections repository for digital materials.

Issues with using these PDF documents include workflow and rights management:

Using PDF Documents: Issues

The decision was made to store the materials  as digital collections; see http://library.ucsd.edu/dc.

Don HawkinsDon Hawkins
Charleston Conference Blogger and Against The Grain Columnist

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