News & Announcements 8/7/14

newspapers2Google and Barnes & Noble Unite to Take On Amazon; Library of Congress Acquires American Ballet Theater Archives; Oxford University Press Releases Who’s Who in the Outbreak of First World War Political Map/Infographic (Free); ARL Opposes STM Model Licenses, Recommends Creative Commons as Alternative; Open-access website gets tough; National Humanities Medal Awarded to AAS; CrossRef and California Digital Library in deal to extend discoverability of scholarly publications; and Six months post launch, 80 percent of UK library services sign up to Access to Research.


 

According to the New York TimesGoogle and Barnes & Noble are joining forces to tackle their mutual rival Amazon, zeroing in on a service that Amazon has long dominated: the fast, cheap delivery of books.

Starting on Thursday, book buyers in Manhattan, West Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area will be able to get same-day deliveries from local Barnes & Noble stores through Google Shopping Express, Google’s fledgling online shopping and delivery service…”


According to InfoDOCKET “the Library of Congress has acquired the American Ballet Theatre’s vast archives and will open a celebratory exhibition about the dance company on Aug. 14.

“American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years” will be displayed in the foyer of the Performing Arts Reading Room in the Library’s James Madison Memorial Building… Also starting Aug. 14, the exhibit can be viewed online at www.loc.gov/exhibits/.


ARL, along with almost 60 other organizations, joined in a letter opposing model licenses recently released by the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (STM). The letter’s signatories are calling for STM to recommend to its member publishers that they work within the Creative Commons framework instead of offering their own customized open access licenses, which increase confusion and decrease interoperability with existing open licenses…”


This article from Nature reports that the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is “asking all of the journals in its directory to reapply on the basis of stricter criteria. It hopes the move will weed out ‘predatory journals’: those that profess to publish research openly, often charging fees, but that are either outright scams or do not provide the services a scientist would expect, such as a minimal standard of peer review or permanent archiving…”


According to this press release the American Antiquarian Society  is the “recipient of a 2013 National Humanities Medal. President Barack Obama presented the medal to AAS president Ellen S. Dunlap at the White House on Monday, July 28, 2014.

President Obama awarded the 2013 National Medal of Arts and the National Humanities Medal to a total of 20 organizations and individuals. Ellen S. Dunlap, AAS president, Sid Lapidus, AAS Council Chair, and William S. Reese, AAS Councilor, accepted the award on behalf of the Society. AAS members David Brion Davis and Anne Firor Scott also received 2013 awards.


According to  “CrossRef and the California Digital Library (CDL) have signed an agreement that opens a route for library publishers to participate in the scholarly communications hub created by CrossRef. Through the agreement, publishers using CDL’s EZID digital identifier service may now choose to deposit the metadata for their content in the CrossRef system. In this way they may use the full range of CrossRef services, including search and discovery, persistent linking, tracking of funding and licensing information, text and data mining, and more…


KnowledgeSpeak also reports that “ten million academic articles, including content from IOP Publishing, are now included in the Access to Research initiative.

Since launching earlier this year, the Access to Research initiative has grown quickly to include the majority of local authorities across England, Scotland and Wales. This means that researchers, students and members of the public across the UK can now access more than 10 million of the world’s leading online academic papers…

 

 

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