Advertisements on Facebook

I have found Facebook fun and entertaining in many ways, even though I don’t play any of the games there.   I like keeping up with friends and family.  I’ve gotten over the problem of connecting with people from the past – all the skeletons in my closet have either been chased out or I’m reconciled to them – well, I suppose there are still some hanging out there but they are the ones unlikely to ever show up on Facebook because they are either dead, in the Witness Protection Program, or too poor, dumb or stubborn to even own a computer (and the stubborn ones are the toughest to deal with!)

I have over 400 “friends” now and most of these are really people I know.  Being old, I have a lot of people I’ve met along the way.  Some, however, are sites that are not really people at all but are entities that I am “friends” with because they set themselves up as though they were people.   Also, I have Facebook friends who have obviously joined Facebook for a reason, and that reason is to push their personal business or enterprise.  This may be non-profit or it may be commercial.  I can’t really throw stones here since my Library too has a Facebook page.  (and my librarian friends, I bet yours does too).   Nowadays, everyone wants to be on Facebook.

But where does it end?  When does it stop being effective?  I DO NOT want to be Friends (or a Fan or “Like”) Walmart, McDonalds, Target, etc.  However, I do find it cute to be “friends” with Tweetsie Railroad and Daniel Boone Inn (the latter sent me a coupon for 15% off just as Joe and I were headed up the hill recently and we enjoyed using it for lunch that very day – effective use of Facebook, yes!)

I am a fan of a local pizza place in Greenville for the same reason – I want to know their specials, and they are likely to advertise them just when I want to know about them.   But there are a lot of people trying to use Facebook in ways that are just not very effective and in some cases annoying.  Mostly because they just don’t get it – you cannot use Facebook as simply another advertisement mechanism – if you do that, you’re gonna lose me.

Marketing via Facebook is something that takes some finesse.  I can’t say I understand it completely, but when in consumer mode, I know what I like and what I don’t.  I do not want commercial businesses forcing their ads on me all the time.  I never did before and that has not changed. There are some sites I will probably drop because of this. Also, those ads on the sidebar of my home page on Facebook are eerie.  They seem targeted to me but many times they are laughable.  And I basically ignore them completely.  Through the years I have learned to tune out ads as much as possible – on TV, radio, and the Internet.  I know that is not always possible – they can draw you in at times.

My Facebook friends who have small, entrepreneurial businesses (a coffee shop, a florist, an insurance agency, etc.) I wish you the best of luck.   I can’t promise I will be able to directly support you (not in your town, etc.) but  I understand your quest to get noticed.

I am really irritated by Facebook spam and I knew they are trying to beat it back but it keeps creeping in.  Many of us got suckered by the restaurant coupon scam recently – my home email account is now getting triple the spam I used to get there thanks to this attack.

I know there are still people who are either frightened or disgusted by Facebook for many different reasons, but I guess I am hopelessly hooked!  Just don’t bother me with advertisements, OK?

And here is a great discussion of non-profits on Facebook…

Four Reasons Why Nonprofits Should Reconsider Facebook

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2 thoughts on “Advertisements on Facebook

  1. Although I’m on the Internet in one other way, I find myself reluctant to go the Facebook route for just the reason you mention–don’t know about dealing with voices from the past.

    I guess I prefer ones from the far past.

  2. Eleanor, I think I know where you’re coming from. I have a good friend from college days who promotes his business online and I’m happy to support it.

    The recent anti-privacy developments by Facebook in which, as another friend put it, we are not the customers but the product, have compelled me to rein in my own communication and what I reveal about myself on Facebook. This is beyond the question of advertising; we–Facebook users–are being advertised.